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A Guide To Dealership Structure

We Take A Look At The Basic Structure Of An Automotive Dealership

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If you're looking to own a car dealership, it helps to understand the structure of the various departments that make up a new-car store.

Dealerships consist of more than just a sales force. In this article, we'll break down the various departments and describe their roles within the company

The most well-known department is of course, the sales department, which usually breaks down into new-car and used-car units. The primary goal for this department is of course to sell cars.

Once the car is sold, the customer will need to finance it. Most dealerships have several employees that help customers arrange financing, and these finance managers often attempt to maximize profits by upselling products such as rust-proofing.

Dealerships need to deal with plenty of paperwork, and most stores will have an accounting or billing department to keep track both of sales deals as well as service and repair bills, as well as to process warranty claims. Employees in this department often don't interact with customers--with the exception of receptionists and customer-service specialists, who might be placed in this department.

Speaking of service, the service department--often referred to as fixed operations--is one of the most important departments in the dealership. The service department consists of the technicians who perform repairs, the service sdvisors who assist customers and sell maintenance packages, and porters who prep just-sold vehicles for delivery. At some stores, porters also wash cars that come in for repairs once the repair is done. And some dealerships employ drivers to pick up and shuttle customers or to shuttle customer's cars to their homes after repairs are complete. On top of that, some high-end dealers offer loaner cars, and employees in the service department might manage that program. Sometimes customer-service specialists fall under this umbrella.

There is also usually a parts department that works under the umbrella of the service department, stocking parts and accessories for repairs as well as for retail sales.

There you have it. Most dealerships consist of sales, service, finance, parts, and accounting departments. Knowing that will help you set up your own new-car store.

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